A Conjuring of Light, by V.E. Schwab

A Conjuring of LightMan. I was suuuuper excited for this book to come out earlier this year, and very upset that it took my library like three whole weeks to process it and get it in my grubby little hands so that I could devour it whole. I mean, not really, eating library books gets expensive. But my plan was to read it in, like, one sitting, and also to love it and cherish it forever and ever.

Best laid plans, and all that.

A Conjuring of Light picks up right after A Gathering of Shadows, with the Triwizard Tournament (still too lazy to look up its real name) just ended and Kell kidnapped to White London, where Holland is trying to pawn off the magic inhabiting and controlling him onto Kell. As one does. Holland fails, which seems good for Kell, except then the magic demon whatsit called Osaron decides to take over Red London, which is decidedly bad for Kell.

This leads to the pretty decent part of the book, which is all the plotting and planning on the part of pretty much everyone who’s ever been in this series to figure out how to save Red London, and by extension Red London’s whole world, from Osaron, who is off collecting bodies to control and using citizens as weapons against their own people. There’s machinations and sabotage and intrigue and I am so many kinds of for that. But then there is also this quest plotline where our pirates go off to find a MacGuffin to defeat the magic monster, which we know where it is because one of our characters sold it a while back and you just have to go to this mysterious floating market and trade away the thing you hold dearest in the world and ohhhhhhhhhhhhh my goodness why are we doing this when we could be plotting and planning and punching things in the face?

I wasn’t super on board with that part, is what I’m saying. Also not super on board with the continuing and completely unnecessary romance subplot, or the big boss fight at the end, or basically any time Kell and Alucard interact in this book. One thing I am totally on board with is the way Schwab handles the Big Reveal I’ve been waiting for this whole series, in that it just happens without a ton of fanfare and everyone’s like, yeah, no, that makes sense.

Overall I liked this book just fine; it’s a decent conclusion to a decent series that is mostly fun brain candy. But I wouldn’t read the series just to get here, is what I’m saying.

A Gathering of Shadows, by V.E. Schwab

A Gathering of ShadowsI read the first book in this series a couple months ago and liked it a heck of a lot, so much that I grabbed up the next book and started it almost as soon as it was in my possession. I’ve been having a spate of reading apathy, so this was a delightful distraction. And, awesomely, I think this book might have been better than the first.

Last time, I told you about all the Londons and the magic and the bad magic and the fancy magician and the totally-not-a-Mary-Sue protagonist and how I liked all the stuff but the ending should have been a cliffhanger. Which is not a thing I say, and in fact when the end of this book was a bit of a cliffhanger I was like, ARE YOU SER— oh, right, I said that was okay, didn’t I?

Anyway, in this go, our magician, Kell, and our wannabe pirate, Lila, are doing their respective things in Red London, Kell’s home. Kell is more or less on house arrest after the events of the first book, but with the upcoming Triwizard Tournament (I am too lazy to look up what this is actually called) he and his sort-of brother hatch a plan to get Kell out of the house and into the tournament.

Meanwhile, Lila is finally getting her pirate on as crew of a government-owned totally-not-a-pirate-ship ship with an intriguing captain who is equally as intrigued with Lila. We get to see more of the Red London world through Lila’s eyes until the ship comes back to Red London so that the captain can participate in the Triwizard Tournament — at which point Lila hatches her own plot to participate.

Meanwhile, in White London, the Dane siblings have been replaced by a very familiar face and a sort of familiar soul, and these two familiar beings have designs on both Red London and Kell himself, if they can just find a way to get him away from the castle.

The plot seems pretty predictable on its surface, and, well, it mostly is, but there are a few bits here and there where things go differently than I thought they might, and also the writing to get to these points is delightful and I can’t help but like it. Things I don’t like include the continuing lack of the Big Reveal that I am sure is coming and the not-quite-sudden inclusion of a Love Story that makes not very much sense and why can’t people just be friends, dang it? Things I do love include the mechanics of the Triwizard Tournament, even if I refuse to remember its name, and the machinations of our friends in White London, which I presume we will see the best of in the next book.

Speaking of which, I am so glad I came in this late to the series, because that next book will be out in less than two months and I am SO EXCITED. If you’re the type that wants a completed series, this is the one for you come March. Or now. It’s not that long to wait. Except that I can’t wait. Hurry up, end of February!

Recommendation: Read the first book first and then this one and then come tell me all your feels.

A Darker Shade of Magic, by V.E. Schwab

A Darker Shade of MagicI’ve seen this book kicking around the bookternet a ton over the past year, but, like I’m Judging You before it, it took a Nerdette podcast to make me actually read it. Thanks, Nerdette, for bringing me more delightful things!

I will say that before I started this book, I had the sense that it was going to be a Different Fantasy Novel, with defied genre stereotypes littered in its wake, but it is not that. It’s not not that, but a lot of the book is very bog-standard fantasy novel, with good guys versus bad guys and magic with consequences and the slightly newer trope of damsel not-so-very-much-in-distress-thank-you.

What is excellent, as I say about all new fantasy books that I love, is the world that Schwab has built. It’s a universe with four separate dimensions all squished up against each other, each containing the city of London and a certain pub inside the city, but with very little else the same. There’s “our” world, with Grey London, which has no magic; then Red London, which is full of happy magic; White London, with scary creepy magic; and finally Black London, which has been overrun by dark magic and thus cut off from from the other Londons.

Our main protagonist, Kell, is one of two sort of magic beings who can move between the Londons (except for Black, of course). He ostensibly takes only messages between the rulers of the different nations of which London is the capital, but he also dabbles in smuggling artifacts to the few knowledgeable collectors in each London, and also maybe saving some cool things for himself. This hobby, as you might guess, gets him in huge trouble when he inadvertently smuggles a piece of Black London back to his own Red London, and more trouble still when he tries to prevent its misuse.

Our second, not-a-damsel protagonist is Lila, a resident of Grey London whose most fervent wish is to become captain of a pirate ship, as you do. In the meantime, she’s a pickpocket of some renown, which gets her into trouble when she picks the pocket of a certain smuggler carrying a certain very dangerous item.

You can probably more or less figure out the plot from there — good guys, bad guys, etc. But getting to the end is the fun part, with interesting characters popping in and out (and out forever, as Schwab seems to have taken a page out of George R.R. Martin’s playbook) and sufficient intrigue and subterfuge to keep me flipping pages. The writing is fantastic, as well, announcing its tone from the very first sentence: “Kell wore a very peculiar coat.” This seems like a pretty innocuous sentence all on its own, but I could go on for far too long about all the awesome tucked in tight in there.

My biggest gripe with the book was its big boss fight (spoiler?); based on the number of pages I had left as I got toward the end I was one hundred percent certain I’d be facing a cliffhanger ending, but instead Schwab tears through the fight almost as quickly and terribly as Stephenie Meyer once did, sacrificing the story for the sake of finishing it in however many pages she was allotted. I don’t say this much, but I would have preferred a cliffhanger.

Still, the rest of the book was so fun and delightful that I’ve already acquired the second one and am already enjoying it, so don’t take that complaint too seriously. I’m hoping my only gripe after the second book will be that the third one hasn’t come out yet!

Recommendation: For fans of fun, fast-paced fantasy and fascinating… magic. Shoot, what’s an f-word for magic?