Weekend Shorts: Gods and Avengers

The Wicked + The Divine, Vol. 3: “Commercial Suicide”, by Kieron Gillen and Jamie McKelvie
The Wicked + The Divine, Vol. 3After the insane ending of the second volume of this series, I was eager to get my hands on this one. So imagine my surprise when I jumped in and found out that this arc has very little to do with those very important events. Shoot!

Well, all right, the first issue (#12) covers a bit of the aftermath, but the story is mostly an excuse for some god-fighting, which is pretty cool on its own, so, okay. The subsequent issues delve a little more into the stories of the individual gods, mostly the ones who haven’t been front and center so far. There’s an issue for Tara that is secretly about the price of fame and the awfulness of the internet, one for Woden that clarifies a few things that happened earlier, one for Amaterasu that talks about identity and appropriation, a… very odd one for The Morrigan and Baphomet, and one for Sakhmet that reminds everyone that cats are adorable and dangerous.

Then, finally, in the last pages, the so-titled “Inevitable Cliffhanger”. These guys are killing me, I swear.

Speaking of these guys, this volume was a little strange as most of the issues weren’t actually drawn by McKelvie, who was gallivanting about somewhere and was replaced by various artists on each issue. Some of the artists stayed close to McKelvie’s art, which made things a bit uncanny valley as I strived to remember who this particular chick with short black hair was supposed to be, and some of the artists (especially Brandon Graham in the Sakhmet issue) went in a completely different direction, which was even more distracting. I don’t know how people who read superhero comics put up with fill-in artists on a regular basis; so much of what I love about my favorite comics is the art and it is so strange to see anything else.

Hawkeye, Vol. 4: “Rio Bravo”, by Matt Fraction and David Aja
Hawkeye, Vol. 4Although, to be fair, guests artists can’t be any stranger than this whole Hawkeye run, especially these last two volumes. Reading them in the collected volumes is the way to go, definitely, since the two storylines trade off in the issues but are kept separate here.

Unfortunately, they gave me the better storyline first, with Kate Bishop off in LA. This half of the story is… way more confusing. We get that terrible jumping-around-in-time thing again, leaving me baffled as to what order anything happens in, and it turns out that Clint has a brother who seems like he might be a bad guy, maybe, but maybe not?, and it also turns out that the tracksuit mafia guys are just trying to maintain a real estate deal, which, what, and also Clint goes deaf and resorts to sign language which makes for some really interesting page layouts but is SO CONFUSING.

I can see why this run didn’t make it any farther, is what I’m saying, but I’m also glad that I read it because Hawkeye is way cooler than Jeremy Renner and Kate Bishop is way cooler than Clint Barton and now I know these things and that makes me smart. And since the next volume of this series (Volume 5, collecting issues #1-5, I hate comics numbering) is written by Jeff Lemire, it is very likely that I will be checking that out in the near future.

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Weekend Shorts: Gods and Monsters

It turns out that settling into a new job requires a lot of effort, and also that having a job that lets you go home for lunch leaves you with very little time to read. Luckily, I have a backlog of comics that fit very nicely into the tiny reading times I currently have. Let’s talk about some!

The Bunker, Vol. 2, by Joshua Hale Fialkov and Joe Infurnari
The Bunker, Vol. 2Huh.

That was my reaction upon finishing this book. Not “Huh?” or “Huh!” or “Huh…”, just “Huh.” I was super psyched after reading the first volume of this comic back in May, with the time travel and the plotting and the subterfuge and the time travel, and I grabbed this second volume immediately upon its arrival at my library. Unfortunately, there’s almost none of the good stuff from the first volume here, and all of the bad.

Time travel? I mean, it’s there, obviously, with the story jumping back and forth, sometimes incredibly subtly, between the now and the future and the times in between, and that’s cool. And I guess the plotting and the subterfuge is there, as most of the book is spent on said plotting and there is a ton of people being told or convinced to do something and then someone else being all, “-tents fingers- All according to plan….” But none of it serves to drive along any semblance of plot, which was definitely the most important part of me loving the first volume, so.

Also not great is the fact that, as was true in the first volume, all of these dang characters look alike. I know there are characters named Grady and Billy and Daniel but hell if I know which one is which, even when they’re standing next to each other, and the girls I just couldn’t even tell you their names right now they’re so neglected. This was okay the first time, when the important stuff was reading letters from the future and wondering if these kids could change the world, but this volume focuses heavily on the stuff that specific characters do to cause the future’s problems and I just don’t even know who did what. Nor do I care. Sorry, The Bunker, I’ve got better comics to spend my time with.

The Wicked + The Divine, Vol. 2: “Fandemonium”, by Kieron Gillen and Jamie McKelvie
The Wicked + The Divine, Vol. 2Like this one! One of the perks of my new job is a coworker who reads several of the same comics I do, though he reads them in issues more often and is way ahead of me on the storylines. When he heard I was reading this series, he nearly spoiled this volume for me, so I knew it was time for me to actually read the dang thing instead of leaving it to look pretty on my shelf.

And, holy smokes, guys. We pick up a little while after the big death of the first volume, with our hero Laura now famous amongst her peers for being there when it happened. She is not dealing well with any of it at all, but decides that finding out what really happened will make everything better. Luckily, several of the gods are on her side and invite her to do crazy godly things while she’s investigating.

These godly things (uh, parties, mostly) are the best bits of this volume, because they lead to the coolest artwork. Issue 8’s “Underground Dionysus Kiss Story Part XI” does amazing things with neon rave colors against the generally dreary colors of Laura’s world, and issue 10 tries a bunch of different things, including a one-page poem art thing (I am good with words), that are all just brilliant.

In plot points, we learn that there are people who think you can kill a god to steal his powers, or that gods can kill other gods to live a little longer (the gods on earth get about 2 years before they all go away again), and we also get a look into Creepy Old Lady Ananke’s backstory and the history of the gods’ 90-year cycle. But of course the most important thing happens at the end of this volume and I refuse to tell you about it because, again, holy smokes, guys. I may have to see if I can borrow the next few issues from my coworker because the next volume doesn’t come out until February and I kinda need to know what happens next.

Weekend Shorts: Wicked, Divine, and Unwritten

The Wicked + The Divine, Vol. 1: “The Faust Act”, by Kieron Gillen and Jamie McKelvie
The Wicked and the Divine, Vol. 1I had heard vague good things about this book around the internets, but not enough to really get me interested. But then I was at the comic shop getting other things and I asked the guy at the counter what he thought about it and he was like, “It’s fantastic, you should buy it immediately.” He was not wrong.

The conceit of this story is that various gods incarnate themselves into the bodies of more or less ordinary twenty-somethings for two years every 90 years, because sure, why not? In their 2014 bodies, the gods are literal rock stars, performing and giving interviews and being totally open and honest about their godly status, but of course no one really believes them. Except maybe for Laura, a groupie who ends up in the right place at the right time to see Luci (slash Lucifer) snap her fingers and explode a couple of dudes’ heads. When Luci is arrested and the other gods more or less abandon her, Laura does everything she can to help out.

This is a fantastic book, starting with the super pretty artwork that I just need to have all over my walls, like, immediately. Look at these covers, people! So gorgeous. And then also it’s neat to see gods from all the different religions (some of whom could be from several religions all by themselves) hanging out doing their god thing, and then even better there’s an intrepid girl reporter on the case who is probably going to be majorly pissed when she finds out these gods are for reals. I’m super in love.

The Unwritten, Issues 45 and 46: “The Corpse Harvest Reiteration”
The Unwritten #45It has been an absurdly long time since I delved into the world of The Unwritten, and I was more than a little worried that I might have forgotten everything. Luckily I found myself at the start of a little two-issue run wherein 1) the action focused mostly not on the overarching plot and 2) our favorite vampire spent a page explaining the important stuff. Thanks, Richie!

The Unwritten #46So in this set of issues, Richie is feeling bad for himself and Didge is doing her police thing, and then the two of them join forces when a little kid loses first his babysitters and then his dad in freak deaths that have brain damage as the common link between them. Turns out the kid is writing stories that come true, and although he’s not explicitly writing anyone into these stories the people he’s basing them on end up in big trouble. It seems that the story world, once thought a bit dead, may be only mostly dead.

I am super excited to get back into this series, which is good because I have a pile of issues and trades lying around for it!

What fantastic short stuff are you reading this weekend?