Lost and Found, by Carolyn Parkhurst

Lost and FoundI really enjoyed Parkhurst’s The Dogs of Babel when I read it a few months ago, and so I was excited to read her second book for my book club this month. But as it sometimes happens, I completely forgot when my book club was supposed to be meeting and only managed to get the book from the library a few days in advance. Oops! I was out and about basically the entire time in between getting the book and talking about it, but thankfully this is a quick and fun read so I managed to finish it up with, like, twenty hours to spare!

I was basically sold on this book when I heard it was based on The Amazing Race, which I watched religiously many many years ago and still will tune into an episode of here and there. There’s something about running around the world and solving puzzles that appeals to me, and if I led a more telegenic life I might have tried out for the show.

Which, segue, is what this book is totally about — the reality behind reality shows, from picking the most interesting contestants to staging drama and fights to what a terrible idea it is to go on a reality show. I don’t know if Parkhurst did any field research into reality show production, but I would totally believe her take on it!

If you’re not a big fan of reality shows, that’s okay, because the meat of the book is the interactions between the characters who have found themselves running around the world together. The main focus is on the mother-daughter team, whose perfect-for-TV drama is that the daughter birthed a baby without her mother knowing she was pregnant; the ex-gay husband-and-wife team who may not be as ex- as they would like; and a former child star looking to game the reality show to make her comeback. It’s fantastic tabloid fodder, but there’s also a truth to all of these characters and their problems that make them sympathetic, if only to the tiniest degree in some cases.

And did I mention the book was fun? It gets a bit heavy-handed at times, especially with the ex-gay subplot that seemed never to end, but it absolutely makes up for it with the digs at TV culture, the travel-inspiring descriptions of the game locations, and the absurd realities of the game. It’s also thought-provoking, if only in the sense that I have been wondering for the past several days, “Why DID the Howells ever go on that three-hour tour? And bring so many clothes?” Seriously. Seriously.

Recommendation: For fans and also not-fans of reality television, or for people who enjoy parrots?

Rating: 8/10

The Dogs of Babel, by Carolyn Parkhurst

The Dogs of BabelMy book club is reading Lost and Found later this year, and maybe a few months ago at a meeting someone was waxing ecstatic about Parkhurst’s first book, The Dogs of Babel, “You know, the one with the talking dogs?”

Right, yeah, that one, no thank you.

“But it’s so good! Look, it’s in the library that you are in RIGHT NOW!” Fine, fine, I said, and then it languished on my shelf for many months until the library was like, no, seriously, bring that back on Monday or you will owe us a dime!

And I had just finished reading The Whore of Akron and I needed something less angry and so I ended up reading this really intriguing and awesome book.

I love it when that happens.

So, this book, it is not actually about talking dogs, not really, but kind of? There’s this fellow, our present-tense narrator, whose wife has died from falling out of a very tall tree and it’s a horrible sad accident except our narrator thinks maybe it wasn’t an accident because of reasons. The only witness to the event is the family dog, and conveniently our narrator is a linguistics professor and conveniently in this fictional world there’s a guy what made a dog actually talk, and so our narrator takes a sabbatical to see if he can’t teach his dog some rudimentary language skills.

But of course there’s more to it than that, and our narrator also spends his sabbatical trying to piece together what might have happened on his own, and what I think is really interesting about this novel is that the wife is a total Manic Pixie Dream Girl and I think this is the first time I’ve encountered an MPDG story in which said MPDG settles down and makes a life with her besotted man, although it would be more exciting if she weren’t, you know, dead. Alas.

Now I really want someone to write a story from the perspective of a Manic Pixie Dream Girl. Has this already happened? Make this happen!

So, anyway, the story was really engaging. I wanted to know what happened to the wife, and what would happen with the dog and the talking, and Parkhurst added in more things I wanted to know about at just the right intervals and then at the end she made me cry and hug my husband and warn him against climbing any incredibly tall trees. And I am now super-excited for Lost and Found, which is apparently about people on an Amazing Race-like show and hey, is it December yet so I can read that book? Hurry along, year!

Recommendation: Read this if you’re looking for a quick page-turner and/or a decent cry.

Rating: 9/10