Arcadia, by Lauren Groff

ArcadiaI read this book a couple months ago for book club, but due to scheduling issues I didn’t get a chance to talk about it with them until just a couple weeks ago. I had hoped that our meeting would give me a better understanding of the book or at least an upgrade in emotions from “…meh.”, but sadly, we were all more or less the same amount of baffled by this book.

It seemed promising-ish in the beginning. The book is divided into four parts, and the first two take place in Arcadia, a hippie commune where our protagonist, Bit, lives with his parents. Bit was born in the commune and so sees it as a totally normal existence, but as outsiders we can see that some of what he sees has a very different meaning than he thinks it does. Life on the commune is tough but bearable, and we come to learn why various people have decided to live there and why some decide to leave. It’s an interesting viewpoint to think about, certainly, though the writing to get there makes very slow reading.

Then we move on to the third part, which skips from Bit’s adolescence on the commune at the end of the second part to his adulthood and the disappearance of his wife and how he’s surviving as a single parent and photography professor. It is… just about as boring as it sounds. My book club was in agreement that we would much rather have had the part that Groff skipped over, where Bit is introduced to non-commune life, even if that’s a more obvious way to go, because it at least would have been amusing in some way.

The last part, which takes place in the near future and sees Bit’s parents in their old age, is also a jarring jump in the narrative, and serves only, as far as I can tell, to tell people that ALS is a horrible terrible disease that no one should ever have to live with. Was there more to this part than that? Maybe, but I can’t remember over the awfulness that is ALS and the cuddles that I am requiring of my cats just thinking about this right now. Ugh.

Ugh.

So… yeah. This was a book, it had words, ALS is bad, communes are not utopias, sometimes bad things happen to Manic Pixie Dream Girls. But even though I was not enamored of the plot, I did feel a certain fondness for something in Groff’s writing which makes me interested in checking out her other books, which everyone I’ve talked to about this has assured me are much better.

Recommendation: Yeah, just skip this one totally.

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