Weekend Shorts: Gods and Monsters

It turns out that settling into a new job requires a lot of effort, and also that having a job that lets you go home for lunch leaves you with very little time to read. Luckily, I have a backlog of comics that fit very nicely into the tiny reading times I currently have. Let’s talk about some!

The Bunker, Vol. 2, by Joshua Hale Fialkov and Joe Infurnari
The Bunker, Vol. 2Huh.

That was my reaction upon finishing this book. Not “Huh?” or “Huh!” or “Huh…”, just “Huh.” I was super psyched after reading the first volume of this comic back in May, with the time travel and the plotting and the subterfuge and the time travel, and I grabbed this second volume immediately upon its arrival at my library. Unfortunately, there’s almost none of the good stuff from the first volume here, and all of the bad.

Time travel? I mean, it’s there, obviously, with the story jumping back and forth, sometimes incredibly subtly, between the now and the future and the times in between, and that’s cool. And I guess the plotting and the subterfuge is there, as most of the book is spent on said plotting and there is a ton of people being told or convinced to do something and then someone else being all, “-tents fingers- All according to plan….” But none of it serves to drive along any semblance of plot, which was definitely the most important part of me loving the first volume, so.

Also not great is the fact that, as was true in the first volume, all of these dang characters look alike. I know there are characters named Grady and Billy and Daniel but hell if I know which one is which, even when they’re standing next to each other, and the girls I just couldn’t even tell you their names right now they’re so neglected. This was okay the first time, when the important stuff was reading letters from the future and wondering if these kids could change the world, but this volume focuses heavily on the stuff that specific characters do to cause the future’s problems and I just don’t even know who did what. Nor do I care. Sorry, The Bunker, I’ve got better comics to spend my time with.

The Wicked + The Divine, Vol. 2: “Fandemonium”, by Kieron Gillen and Jamie McKelvie
The Wicked + The Divine, Vol. 2Like this one! One of the perks of my new job is a coworker who reads several of the same comics I do, though he reads them in issues more often and is way ahead of me on the storylines. When he heard I was reading this series, he nearly spoiled this volume for me, so I knew it was time for me to actually read the dang thing instead of leaving it to look pretty on my shelf.

And, holy smokes, guys. We pick up a little while after the big death of the first volume, with our hero Laura now famous amongst her peers for being there when it happened. She is not dealing well with any of it at all, but decides that finding out what really happened will make everything better. Luckily, several of the gods are on her side and invite her to do crazy godly things while she’s investigating.

These godly things (uh, parties, mostly) are the best bits of this volume, because they lead to the coolest artwork. Issue 8’s “Underground Dionysus Kiss Story Part XI” does amazing things with neon rave colors against the generally dreary colors of Laura’s world, and issue 10 tries a bunch of different things, including a one-page poem art thing (I am good with words), that are all just brilliant.

In plot points, we learn that there are people who think you can kill a god to steal his powers, or that gods can kill other gods to live a little longer (the gods on earth get about 2 years before they all go away again), and we also get a look into Creepy Old Lady Ananke’s backstory and the history of the gods’ 90-year cycle. But of course the most important thing happens at the end of this volume and I refuse to tell you about it because, again, holy smokes, guys. I may have to see if I can borrow the next few issues from my coworker because the next volume doesn’t come out until February and I kinda need to know what happens next.

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