A God in Ruins, by Kate Atkinson

A God in RuinsI loved Life After Life with a fiery burning passion, and when I heard there was a second novel in that universe coming out, I may have done a happy dance. I couldn’t wait to spend more time in Ursula’s strange time-altering world.

So when I realized early on that this book, which is about Ursula’s brother Teddy, that the whole reincarnation-ish aspect of Life After Life was going to be pretty much ignored, I was hugely disappointed. I had thought it would be fascinating to see how Ursula’s lives affected Teddy, but instead there’s just a brief mention near the beginning about how sometimes Teddy felt like he could see his whole life ahead of him and then a straightforward novel. Well, I mean, straightforward compared to Life After Life.

What Atkinson does here instead is jump all around in Teddy’s one life, writing briefly of his childhood and then his war years and then his married years and then his widower years and then back to the war years and then forward to the grandpa years and then some chapters from the point of view of his kid and grandkids and wife thrown in for good measure.

Many of the vignettes of the novel are told more than once from different perspectives (present, past, other characters), and it is fascinating to see how the same event can look completely different. Atkinson does this great thing, too, where she relates the story as if for the very first time, so that the variations in the story don’t get any sort of prominence and you almost have to work to remember that that one character thought something completely different had happened. I almost want to go back and read the book again, to experience the first half or so the right way (I waited a long time for the weird to happen) and to catch all the little bits I know I must have missed.

Setting aside the narrative style, the narrative itself is also a pretty good one. Where Life After Life covered World War II and the London Blitz and the horror of the war in England, this book is more about Teddy as a survivor of that war. There is plenty about his role in the war itself, bombing the heck out of Germany and presuming every flight in his plane would be the last, but there’s even more about how that part of his life is almost completely erased after it’s over. He’s expected to move on, and so he does, sort of, but the war is always in the back of his mind and on the pages of this book. And then there’s this whole other storyline about family and parenthood and what it means to love someone who doesn’t (can’t? won’t?) love you back and what love even is, really, and the whole thing is heartbreaking in a million different ways.

It’s so good, guys. I wanted it to be a different book, but it stubbornly refused to listen to me, and I’m so glad it didn’t. I may never get around to Atkinson’s mysteries (which I do very much want to read), but I will read the heck out of whatever giant historical novel she writes next, and y’all know that’s saying something.

Recommendation: For lovers of Life After Life, but especially for those who wanted to love Life After Life but couldn’t get past the reincarnation. This is your book!

Rating: 9/10

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9 thoughts on “A God in Ruins, by Kate Atkinson

  1. Lucybird says:

    I am jealous that you got to read this already! I am hoping to get in on a blog hop for it, so hopefully I will get it next week, but I want it already! I loved Life After Life, and even though this sounds more different than I was expecting it still sounds like something I will really enjoy.

    Thanks for the review

  2. JAYE! says:

    I’m adding this to my list, but I won’t get around to it for a while, since (OMG) summer semester just started. But this — and /Life After Life/, which was already on my list from before — sound fantastic.

  3. Cari says:

    Oh, I think you would like her mysteries. I liked Life After Life too, but I wasn’t sure how this would be because I knew there was no reincarnation aspect. I’ll have to give it a try 🙂

  4. Heather says:

    LIFE AFTER LIFE is not about reincarnation; it’s about: What if???…the path not chosen(or offered) We could all write a novel about our own lives speculating on what might have been.

    • Alison says:

      Oh, yes, definitely. But I like how it was framed in the quasi-reincarnation concept, not just “what could have been” but “what if I could change things?”

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