The Year of the Flood, by Margaret Atwood

The Year of the FloodAnother road trip, another Margaret Atwood plague-apocalypse book. So it is written. But it’s probably a good thing we were listening to this on a road trip with few other listening options, because the beginning of this book is rough and there were a couple of times we might have thrown in the towel on it.

In the first book, the narration trades off between the post-apocalypse Snowman and his pre-apocalypse alter ego Jimmy, and it’s fascinating because you want to know how Jimmy became Snowman. But in this book the narration trades off between pre- and post-Flood Toby and pre- and post-Flood Ren, with most of the narration at the beginning of the novel coming pre-Flood, so a) there’s a lot of timelines to follow and b) if you’ve read Oryx and Crake you already know what the Flood is so there’s not much suspense on that front.

But once the story gets going, it gets interesting. A lot of the story is focused on the God’s Gardeners group that is briefly mentioned in the first book and which is a sort of religion/cult/commune based on vegetarianism and pacifism and the worshipping of saints like Dian Fossey and E.O. Wilson, which yes, totally. It is pretty cool to see the Gardeners from the perspectives of Ren, who came to the group as a ten-year-old, and Toby, who as an adult is rescued into the group from a rather more terrible life. It’s also fascinating to hear (because audiobook) the sermons of Adam One, the leader of the group, which are interspersed between chapters and whose tones change to match the world outside, and the hymns which are actually set to music for the audiobook. Super neat!

The other big part of this book is that it tracks the story of Oryx and Crake, giving background to the tertiary characters of that book, fleshing out the world outside of Jimmy’s view, and moving just a bit farther forward in time than the end of that first book. On the one hand, this is pretty neat and makes the world that Atwood created that much larger and more real. On the other hand, there’s almost too much overlap between the books to the point where you’re like, oh, Jimmy’s having sex with yet another character in this book? Jimmy meets Ren for the fifty-seventh time? FANTASTIC.

But I really do love the world-building, and I cannot get enough of Atwood’s gorgeous sentences, so it’s all good. I will definitely be picking up MaddAddam when it is time for another road trip!

Recommendation: For fans of plague fiction and the world of Oryx and Crake, although it’s probably not strictly necessary to read them in order.

Rating: 7/10

p.s. One of the God’s Gardeners is called Eve Six and I cannot help but wonder if Atwood is an X-Files fan.

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