Oryx and Crake, by Margaret Atwood

Oryx and CrakeI brought this audiobook to listen to with my husband on a recent road trip, which was a great idea except for the fact that I haven’t listened to an audiobook in ages and I think I may have forgotten how to do it. I found myself often asking Scott to explain something that had just been explained thoroughly by the narrator, or backing up a track or two after a rest stop because in the five minutes I was away from the car I forgot everything that had happened. I will partially blame this on the narrator, who had a voice that was so soothing that I literally fell asleep to it, missing an hour or so of story that I wasn’t willing to make Scott listen to again.

But the parts that registered with me were super fascinating, so as soon as I got back to work I procured the print copy and proceeded to start the thing all over again, which was good because I missed more little details than I thought I did. It was also good because Atwood throws in a few “If only I knew then what I knew now”s which were all the more terrible for having that future knowledge.

I didn’t know when I picked this book out that it was going to be another in this year’s spate of superflu-type reads, but hey, it’s a theme, let’s go with it! The story starts after Some Terrible Thing has happened and a dude called Snowman is the only person left in the world except for a group of people he is sort of in charge of and who don’t understand clothes or body hair or meat-eating, for not-yet-explained reasons. Snowman tells them stories of Oryx and Crake, who are painted as vaguely god-like creatures who watch over this strange group, but it’s clear there is more to these stories.

So we jump back in time (yay!) to when Snowman was a child called Jimmy, living on a tech-business compound with his scientist dad and ex-scientist mom. His compound, and others like it, are basically gated communities designed to keep out the diseases rampant out in the pleeblands while the scientists work on curing them or at least genetically engineering ways to avoid them. Enter strange animal hybrids like the rakunk, bobkitten, and pigoon, the last of which is a breeder of new organs for humans, which is… cool? Anyway, Jimmy makes friends with a new kid in school named Glenn but called Crake, and as you can probably guess he plays a bit of a role in Jimmy becoming Snowman, and in the creation of Snowman’s odd friends.

The book is a great and terrifying bit of world-building, with great scientific advancements contrasted with some awful and/or disgusting ones that are going to put me off my chicken nuggets for a while (but not long, which is the worst part). There is fascinating commentary on all sorts of topics, from genetic engineering to scientific ethics to the exploitation of minors to the vulgarity of the internet, and Atwood is so good that I found myself agreeing with pretty much every side of every argument. I’m even kind of rooting for the Noodie News to exist… wait, it probably already does, doesn’t it? I am NOT googling that. I just googled that. It totally exists. Canada, you’re so weird.

Aaanyway, I quite enjoyed this book and I am super excited that there are two companion books that exist so that I don’t have to think too hard about my next road-trip listen. I’m just going to have to stay awake this time!

Recommendation: For anyone not sick of super-flu (haaa) and anyone who likes thinky speculative fiction.

Rating: 8/10

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