World War Z, by Max Brooks

World War ZI had been meaning to listen to this book ever since I found out that it was a full cast recording, and especially since I found out that the full cast included such people as Jeri Ryan and Nathan Fillion. Yes, please! Unfortunately, all of the library places I tried to find the audiobook in had only the original, abridged version (without Nathan Fillion, the horror!) and I was having none of that. So I watched the movie instead, which was pretty okay but obviously not anything like the book.

Finally I found the unabridged version and took it on a road trip in November, but then it turned out that the book was about two hours longer than the road trip — and of course I couldn’t finish it without Scott present since he had listened to it with me — and so I didn’t finish listening to it until another road trip over a month later. So if I have failed to remember things correctly or at all, that is the reason why!

The premise of the book is that it has been written after the Zombie War, aka World War Z, a decade or so when humans became zombie-like creatures and ate brains and temporarily took over the world until such time as the non-zombies figured out how to fight back. Different areas tried different tactics for keeping the zombies at bay, with varying success, and so Max Brooks the character went around the world to talk to all sorts of people and collect their stories for posterity.

The stories are ordered roughly chronologically from the beginning of the zombie plague to the end of the war, and they are all pretty interesting. There are stories from military people and civilians; those who lost everything and those who managed not to; those who came out of the war decently sane and those who went crazy or feral. Some stories I especially liked: the one with the guy who made boat-loads of money selling useless zombie cures, the one with the woman whose plane is shot down and who makes it to safety with the help of a pal on the CB or ham radio or whatever, the one with the girl whose family protects her at all costs, the one with the guy talking about the officer who went nuts, and the one where Nathan Fillion talks to me about who cares what. Swoooon.

If you can time your road trip right, I have to say that this is a fantastic book to listen to, because the short stories give you lots of good stopping points when it is time for gas or lunch or whatnot. And, as mentioned above, it is a full cast recording and so instead of one dude talking at you for twelve hours there are, like, forty people talking at you for a few minutes each.

On the minus side, there are a lot of foreign dudes (and I do mean dudes, lots of dudes) in the book and the producers of the audio did not always procure appropriately foreign dudes to voice those characters, so sometimes there are cringe-worthy fake accents and sometimes there are descriptions of a particular kind of dude who is then played by an obviously not-that-kind-of-dude.

But it’s still a good listen, and I would definitely recommend it for your next twelve-hours-or-more road trip. I may need to bust out my print copy at some point in the future and see how it reads, though, as I mostly remember the individual stories that I liked best and not really the whole arc of the novel.

Rating: 8/10

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