A Mutiny in Time, by James Dashner

A Mutiny in TimeOkay, so, twenty pages in I knew this wasn’t the book for me. However, I promised my younger brother that I would read it and he is not the type to forget a promise made to him, and also the book is really short so whatever, I read it. And it was soooo bad.

Basically, this is the first in a series that is similar to The 39 Clues — two precocious kids find themselves in the middle of a crazy plot that extends hundreds of years into the past and are the only ones who can solve the puzzles and save the world, with the help of a slightly older but still underage guardian. I don’t know if there are trading cards with this series, but there’s definitely an online component and I’m sure there’s lots of money being made.

Anyway. The premise here is that a history-loving kid, Dak, has a great idea to let his science-loving “BFF forever” Sera into his science-loving parents’ lab, and she goes ahead and finishes building their time travel device, as a ten-year-old is wont to do. But of course, it’s not quite that simple, as the two kids are living in an alternate universe where some shadowy organization (the SQ) runs everything because they’ve changed history in their favor, and the kids end up recruited to a second shadowy organization (the Hystorians) dedicated to putting history right, but before they can learn all the things they need to save the world the first shadowy organization attacks the second one and Dak and Sera and Riq (a language-lover) end up going back in time by themselves.

There’s… kind of a lot going on. And it happens really really fast, because there are not many pages in this book and they have to invent time travel and then use it and then solve some puzzles and then fix this first problem in history. So the last part is like, look! We’re in Spain in 1492! The voyage to America must be the problem! Oh no, we’re being attacked by an SQ operative! Oh, good, we’re saved by a Hystorian! Now we’re on a boat! Now we know how to solve the problem! Now we’re in the brig! Now we’re not in the brig! Now we’ve saved the day!

The speediness wasn’t the only thing that bothered me, either. The very first thing that made me wary of the book was the naming. Dak Smyth. The Hystorians. Riq. Brint. Fraderick. I get it, we’re in an alternate universe where people don’t know how to spell. Awesome. But then also I noticed that this book was ostensibly about history and didn’t teach me a darned thing. Sure, Dak spouted off a bunch of history stuff, but considering what universe he lives in I’m not sure how true it is. And even when we’re actually on Columbus’s ship and the kids are trying to stop a mutiny, I was like, well, was there a planned mutiny? Are these SQ mutineers real people? I’m thinking maybe or sort of.

Probably a lot of what I didn’t like was caused by First-Book Infodump Syndrome, but I can’t imagine the series is going to get vastly better. Maybe if I were ten again I would be totally into this — my brother certainly loves it at fourteen — but as it stands I’m glad I have Liar and Spy on my TBR pile to cleanse my brain.

Recommendation: Probably for the tweenage history buff or series devourer in your life.

Rating: 4/10

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