The Sparrow, by Mary Doria Russell (9 September − 13 September)

Read this book. Seriously.

The Sparrow mostly follows the story of Emilio Sandoz, a Jesuit priest who, through coincidences (or God’s work?) ends up on a mission to a just-discovered planet near Alpha Centauri. The book follows two timelines, one starting when Sandoz returns to Earth, as the last surviving member of the crew, several years after some very embarrassing and horrifying information about Sandoz has made its own way back. He is to report on the mission to his superiors, but has to get over what happened to him before he can face the other priests.

The other timeline starts back at the beginning, with the events leading up to the discovery of the planet, then details the mission and what happens after the crew lands on Rakhat. This second timeline slowly fills in the large number of blanks left in the first, and helps make Sandoz’s alleged crimes understandable.

I don’t want to be too specific here, because a lot of what I loved about the book was the way Russell would bring in a fact without explanation, causing me to say, “What? When did that happen? Why?” and then a little while later the narrative would answer my question.

I loved this book a whole ridiculous bunch. It’s an interesting take on what would happen if we found life on another planet and went out to meet it, and if meeting that life would go just how we might expect it. I’m a big fan of the dual timeline, and Russell uses this to her great advantage.

The one thing I didn’t like terribly much is that the ending happens so fast − you spend a lot of time leisurely following the stories and then all of a sudden Russell is throwing in forced exposition in order to tie up the story. I would gladly have read another hundred pages (the book is about 400); the rushed ending was unnecessary and made the religious tie-ins at the end seem a bit trite.

Rating: 9.5/10

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